notes

“Happy books, these are, with happy names, Eugene Thacker’s IN THE DUST OF THIS PLANET, a title so snappy that it immediately got appropriated and stuck on a clothing line.
Extinction Aesthetic.

So there’s the latest news from philosophy, the saviors of the human condition: nothing actually matters and building a future is pointless because Matthew McConaughey says time is a flat circle, the middle of the three-ring circus that will soon be subsumed in the dust of this planet. Posterity is silent.“

***

“Probably the best sf short story ever written is Samuel R. Delany’s “Aye, And Gomorrah…” Cheery title, yes. I don’t think it’s hard to find. It’s about null-gendered astronauts and the way they live, including feeding off a fetishist fan base.“

https://kindle.amazon.com/work/cunning-plans-talks-warren-ellis-ebook/B00Z9LFC8U/B00Z9LFC8U

Cyberwar, God And Television

Virilio: […]

There is a great science-fiction short story, it’s too bad I can’t remember the name of its author, in which a camera has been invented which can be carried by flakes of snow. Cameras are inseminated into artificial snow which is dropped by planes, and when the snow falls, there are eyes everywhere. There is no blind spot left.

CTHEORY: But what shall we dream of when everything becomes visible?

Virilio: We’ll dream of being blind.

Cyberwar, God And Television: Interview with Paul Virilio (12/1/1994)

 

all the problems disappeared

In old days I used to be miserable at seeming ridiculous. Not seeming, but being. I have always been ridiculous, and I have known it, perhaps, from the hour I was born. Perhaps from the time I was seven years old I knew I was ridiculous. Afterwards I went to school, studied at the university, and, do you know, the more I learned, the more thoroughly I understood that I was ridiculous. So that it seemed in the end as though all the sciences I studied at the university existed only to prove and make evident to me as I went more deeply into them that I was ridiculous. It was the same with life as it was with science. With every year the same consciousness of the ridiculous figure I cut in every relation grew and strengthened. Everyone always laughed at me. But not one of them knew or guessed that if there were one man on earth who knew better than anybody else that I was absurd, it was myself, and what I resented most of all was that they did not know that. But that was my own fault; I was so proud that nothing would have ever induced me to tell it to anyone. This pride grew in me with the years; and if it had happened that I allowed myself to confess to anyone that I was ridiculous, I believe that I should have blown out my brains the same evening. Oh, how I suffered in my early youth from the fear that I might give way and confess it to my schoolfellows. But since I grew to manhood, I have for some unknown reason become calmer, though I realised my awful characteristic more fully every year. I say ‘unknown’, for to this day I cannot tell why it was. Perhaps it was owing to the terrible misery that was growing in my soul through something which was of more consequence than anything else about me: that something was the conviction that had come upon me that nothing in the world mattered. I had long had an inkling of it, but the full realisation came last year almost suddenly. I suddenly felt that it was all the same to me whether the world existed or whether there had never been anything at all: I began to feel with all my being that there was nothing existing. At first I fancied that many things had existed in the past, but afterwards I guessed that there never had been anything in the past either, but that it had only seemed so for some reason. Little by little I guessed that there would be nothing in the future either. Then I left off being angry with people and almost ceased to notice them. Indeed this showed itself even in the pettiest trifles: I used, for instance, to knock against people in the street. And not so much from being lost in thought: what had I to think about? I had almost given up thinking by that time; nothing mattered to me. If at least I had solved my problems! Oh, I had not settled one of them, and how many there were! But I gave up caring about anything, and all the problems disappeared.

The Dream of a ridiculous man, Dostoyesvky

Do not believe—and I am dead serious when I say this—do not assume that order and stability are always good

“…today we live in a society in which spurious realities are manufactured by the media, by governments, by big corporations, by religious groups, political groups—and the electronic hardware exists by which to deliver these pseudo-worlds right into the heads of the reader, the viewer, the listener. Sometimes when I watch my eleven-year-old daughter watch TV, I wonder what she is being taught. The problem of miscuing; consider that. A TV program produced for adults is viewed by a small child. Half of what is said and done in the TV drama is probably misunderstood by the child. Maybe it’s all misunderstood. And the thing is, Just how authentic is the information anyhow, even if the child correctly understood it? What is the relationship between the average TV situation comedy to reality? What about the cop shows? Cars are continually swerving out of control, crashing, and catching fire. The police are always good and they always win. Do not ignore that point: The police always win. What a lesson that is. You should not fight authority, and even if you do, you will lose. The message here is, Be passive. And—cooperate. If Officer Baretta asks you for information, give it to him, because Officer Beratta is a good man and to be trusted. He loves you, and you should love him.

So I ask, in my writing, What is real? Because unceasingly we are bombarded with pseudo-realities manufactured by very sophisticated people using very sophisticated electronic mechanisms. I do not distrust their motives; I distrust their power. They have a lot of it. And it is an astonishing power: that of creating whole universes, universes of the mind. I ought to know. I do the same thing. It is my job to create universes, as the basis of one novel after another. And I have to build them in such a way that they do not fall apart two days later. Or at least that is what my editors hope. However, I will reveal a secret to you: I like to build universes which do fall apart. I like to see them come unglued, and I like to see how the characters in the novels cope with this problem. I have a secret love of chaos. There should be more of it. Do not believe—and I am dead serious when I say this—do not assume that order and stability are always good, in a society or in a universe. The old, the ossified, must always give way to new life and the birth of new things. Before the new things can be born the old must perish. This is a dangerous realization, because it tells us that we must eventually part with much of what is familiar to us. And that hurts. But that is part of the script of life. Unless we can psychologically accommodate change, we ourselves begin to die, inwardly. What I am saying is that objects, customs, habits, and ways of life must perish so that the authentic human being can live. And it is the authentic human being who matters most, the viable, elastic organism which can bounce back, absorb, and deal with the new.”

How to Build a Universe That Doesn’t Fall Apart Two Days Later by Philip K. Dick

Beckett — Sans / Lessness

Written at the end of the 1960s, this short text is one of the most experimental of Samuel Beckett’s pieces of fiction. It was originally written in French, entitled Sans (“without”), and translated by Beckett himself as Lessness (New Statesman, 1 May 1970). Partly inspired by experimental music by John Cage and other 1960s compositions, Beckett created a rigid framework within which he allows chance to be the main structuring principle of his text.`

http://www.litencyc.com/php/sworks.php?rec=true&UID=2307

Lessness is a prose piece by Samuel Beckett in which he    used random permutation to order sentences.  Although    Lessness is linear prose, its orderly disorder calls for a    reading process in which the reader works to untangle the threads of    sameness and difference to discern the underlying structure,    becoming aware of the usually unconscious processes of    interpretation. Tightly interwoven contradictory perspectives drive    the reader’s attempts at reconciliation. The two halves of    Lessness are two of the 8.3 x 1081 possible orderings of Beckett’s 60    sentences.

https://www.random.org/lessness/paper/

 

txt: http://fr.scribd.com/doc/47946673/1970-Samuel-Beckett-Lessness

I couldn’t find the original text in french.

(Maybe i’ll type it once i get the book.)